My Independent Project

My independent project was on plant health care. The three plants I had were boxwood, Japanese tree peonies, and candy grass. I was excited about the research part of my project because I love learning new things about my plant. Even though I had three plants to research on, I mainly focused on boxwood and peonies since these two plants were actually at Adams National Historical Site. I had a little trouble researching about candy grass, so I put my attention on the two plants that mattered the most. From many hours of researching, I found out many interesting facts about my plants. I found out that boxwood’s most common pest is boxwood leaf miner which can be treated with neem oil insecticide. Also, I learned that peonies have powdery mildew which is a common fungal disease. To properly care for this condition is by practicing proper maintenance by watering in the morning, using fertilizer, and pruning the plant to create air circulation.  The highlights of working on this project were drawing a map of the plant layout to show where peonies and boxwood are located. I also made a key of what the plants conditions were like, such as the diseases or pests they might carry. I also enjoyed researching about these plants because I felt like a plant scientist, by trying to figure out what problems my plants faced and how I can solve them so they are in better condition. My park will benefit from this project my having a researched typed project to look back on to see how to care for the plants I researched on.

Peony maybe with a viral disease.

Peony maybe with a viral disease.

A drawn map of the plant location.

A drawn map of the plant location.

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Lichen on Boxwood.

Lichen on Boxwood.

 

Powdery Mildew on Peony.

Powdery Mildew on Peony.

Peony maybe with Botrytis blight fungus.

Peony maybe with Botrytis blight fungus.

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A healthy peony shrub.

 

One response to “My Independent Project

  1. Hi, It’s Mona from Longfellow House. If you meet Scott Hyndman today he is very good with virus diseases on plants. I usually just prune out the bad spot and don’t make the time to get it tested to see what it is. Maybe the soil was too rich in one spot or over watered or both? I will hear more about it at your presentation today.

    The boxwood needs thin pruning with hand snips. We shear prune the foliage in late summer then thin-prune out the dense areas and dead wood in Fall. The dead wood tips are removed in this way but it takes time. It is not a problem for the plant’s health but it makes it look better and the new growth sprouts up more vigorously next to the fresh cut. I am sure Bob already told you this.

    We really appreciate the work all of the Branching Out do in our parks. It helps us make time to do those things we need to get to … like thin-pruning the boxwood.

    Like

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