New Things, New Experiences, New Outlook

There are many new things I have learned in my short span of time here at Adams. I have been introduced to many plants, tools, and techniques that I have never encountered or experienced before. I feel it best to touch on a couple of things I’ve learned about rather than just one so that I can document my learning and progression.

The Hedge

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The first thing I hold dearest to my heart is learning about cutting the hedge. I believe it safe to say the hedge is the staple of the garden here at Adams. Luckily, I arrived at a time that the hedge began to look overgrown, requiring trimming. After watching my mentor, Bob, and Matt work on it for a few days I decided it was something I was very interested in learning about, fueled by my interest in landscape architecture. I realized the hedge was almost like the foundation of the garden- outlining the different beds and creating a unique look unlike any other garden I and many others have seen. This peaked my natural creative curiosity.

Trimming a Hedge:

Tools:

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STAKES

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SHEARS

STRING

STRING

Steps:

  1. The first step in trimming is placing the stakes at both corners of the hedge. This will allow you to tie string in the future.
  2. The next step is to tie the string to the stakes as previously mentioned. You’ll want to measure the exact height you want the hedge to be when finished, and try sliding the string as accurately as possible to that height. The string will act as your guide while trimming.
  3. Now you can start trimming the hedge. Make sure to pay attention to the string and the height at which you are cutting. Stay consistent and be confident and precise in your cutting. If necessary, take breaths and breaks and look at the hedge from another angle to make sure you haven’t caught a case of tunnel vision (this is what I had to do!)
  4. Admire your work and move on to the next section of hedge!
STAKE IT!

1. STAKE IT!

STRING IT!

2. STRING IT!

CUT IT!

3. CUT IT!

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4. CHECK IT!

Learning how to cut the hedge proved to be a very rewarding experience. It allowed me to tap into my creative expression and gave me a break from weeding! It is pretty easy but does require conciseness, attention to detail, and practice. Now, every edge I pass by, I look at with a critical eye.

Other Tools, and Plants here at Adams

Balloon flowers and Babybreath

Balloon flowers and Babybreath

Cleome have recently become one of my favorite flowers. We transplanted these from the greenhouse about a week or two after we first arrived at Adams. They grow faster than almost any other flower in the garden, abundantly spread their seeds, and are so stunning! I feel like a proud parent when I look at them. :')

Cleome have recently become one of my favorite flowers. We transplanted these from the greenhouse about a week or two after we first arrived at Adams. They grow faster than almost any other flower in the garden, abundantly spread their seeds, and are so stunning! I feel like a proud parent when I look at them. :’)

The break bench! One of my favorite tools to utilize after diligently working in the smoldering garden. ;)

The break bench! One of my favorite tools to utilize after diligently working in the smoldering garden. ๐Ÿ˜‰

The lunch room! Where there's an 80% chance The Price is Right is on and someone's got something great to eat!

The lunch room! Where there’s an 80% chance The Price is Right is on and someone’s got something great to eat!

Tune in next week for blogging about our week long trip to Roosevelt-Vanderbilt National Historical Site in NY!

Experience: that most brutal of teachers. But you learn, my God do you learn.
~C. S. Lewis

4 responses to “New Things, New Experiences, New Outlook

  1. Jayla, I read your post from Seattle, WA. I’m a great fan of the Adams National Historical Park, and the work of Bob Mackenzie. I really enjoyed your post, thanks so much for sharing the information. Good luck and great job!

    Like

  2. Very insightful post, Jayla. The boxwood hedge is a character defining feature in the garden and I appreciate the care with which you have described caring for it. Great work!

    Like

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